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‘Evil and unremorseful’ teen, 13, kills grandmother

by Leigh Egan

A 13-year-old Alabama boy allegedly admitted that he shot and killed his own grandmother in Semmes on Thursday, but according to police, showed absolutely no emotion when confessing.

AL.com reports that Mobile County Sheriff’s Office Captain (MCSO) Paul Burch stated that not only does the teen have no remorse, but that authorities can confirm that the 13-year-old indeed pulled the trigger. Two other teens were involved in the shooting, including Erik Tommer, 19, and a 15-year-old.

“We can affirmatively say that he pulled the trigger.”

Detectives said that the incident happened off of Floyd Circle on late Thursday afternoon.  Mary Williams Faulk, 68, was found shot to death in her home. Twenty miles away from the crime scene, detectives found the three teen suspects sitting inside of Faulk’s car. The teens fled into the woods when they saw the police, but they were eventually caught and taken in for questioning.

READ This: Houston mom found shot to death in home

All three teens admitted to playing a part in Faulk’s murder. The 13-year-old was the only suspect related to Faulk, and it surprised and frustrated MCSO Captain Burch that the kid didn’t seem the least bit upset.

“He was not remorseful in the least. my conversation with him showed a very evil person and in 28 years I have not seen someone like that…The other teens were a little more remorseful, but he (the 13-year-old) showed absolutely nothing.”

The oldest teen, Toomer, was charged with possession of marijuana and being an accessory to murder after the fact. He was sent to Mobile jail and given a $25,000 bond.

The two younger teens were both charged with murder and sent to juvenile. Burch said that the 13-year-old will be charged as a juvenile.

“He committed the crime but he can not be charged as an adult because he’s 13 and according to Alabama state law he has to be 14.”

Leigh Egan is a crime-fighting journalist and editor who specializes in breaking news and investigative true crime coverage. With more than a decade of experience under her belt, Leigh’s work can be found in a number of high-profile national publications. For Leigh, learning didn’t stop after college. She considers herself a lifelong learner who frequently takes media and journalism courses to keep abreast of the latest happenings and innovations in her field.