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Bill Self

Vandalism, assault, rape: Is the Kansas Jayhawks’ coach rewarding bad behavior?

Despite the University of Kansas (KU) Jayhawks, the nation’s leading college basketball team, running into a slew of legal issues over the past few months, it’s unknown if—or when—coach Bill Self will punish wayward players.

Sophomore McKenzie Calvert, a women’s basketball player, has seen her minutes per game halved. There has been no reason given as to why but The Dallas Morning News pointed out that freshman Josh Jackson, 20, hasn’t missed a game this season despite being charged with criminal damage to property on Friday.

The charge is connected to a December 9 incident where the 20-year-old allegedly kicked Calvert’s car door and tail light during an argument. Jackson won’t be arraigned until seven business days after the NCAA championship game, according to The Kansas Star.

An investigation conducted by KU’s Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access determined that Jackson’s teammate, Lagerald Vick, hit Calvert in the arm and kicked her in the face on multiple occasions in December. They recommended the team’s guard face two years of school probation.

Similar to Jackson, it is unclear whether he’s been punished by the University—but they continue to play.

During the same month, a 16-year-old alleged she was raped at McCarthy Hall, where males—including the men’s basketball team—are housed. Authorities said the teen was attacked at some time between 10 pm on December 17 and 5 am the following day, according to the New York Post.

Five members of the men’s basketball team, an athletic administrator, and two 19-year-old women were interviewed about the incident.

CBS Sports reported that fellow Jayhawk Carlton Bragg, 21, was charged with misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia after two glass smoking devices with residue were discovered during KU police’s investigation into the rape. Though the sophomore missed three games, he was back on the court after entering a diversion agreement on February 1.

[Feature Photo: AP/Orlin Wagner]