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Little girl suffers whole-body burns playing sick ‘Fire Fairy’ game: Report [WARNING! GRAPHIC PHOTOS]

by Ellen Killoran

The twisted internet game instructs children to turn on their stoves in the middle of the night

A five-year-old girl reportedly suffered severe burns after playing a sinister Russian internet game called “Fire Fairy,” which purportedly encourages children to turn on their gas stoves in the middle of the night.

According to Metro UK, Five-year-old Sofia Ezhova was burned nearly all over her body when she attempted to play the game. Photos published by Metro and The Sun show the little girl with burn scars all over her torso, legs, and scalp.

The game reportedly promises children they will become “fire fairies” if they turn on their gas stoves during the night and recite “magic words.”

Metro published the translated instructions from the game, which is written in Russian, and reportedly is designed to look like it’s associated with a popular children’s television show Winx Club, which is originally from Italy and available internationally, including in the United States.

At midnight, when everyone is asleep, get out of your bed and go around the room three times. Then say the magic words: ‘Alfey kingdom, sweet little fairies, give me the power, I’m asking you’.

Then go to the kitchen silently, so no one notices you or the magic of the words will disappear. Switch on the gas stove – all four burners – but do not light it. You don’t want to get burns, do you? Then go to sleep.

‘The magic gas will come to you, you will breathe it while sleeping and in the morning, when you wake up, say ‘Thank you Alfeya, I’ve become a fairy.’  And you will become a real fairy of fire.

Reports of this dangerous, twisted game come as a social media game called “Blue Whale” is being blamed by some for over 130 teen suicides in Russia. That game reportedly instructs players to engage in increasingly self-harming activities over the course of 50 days, until players are told to kill themselves.

 

Photo: YouTube Screenshot/Winx Club

Ellen is a seasoned journalist and former media & entertainment reporter with a taste for true crime. Formerly a senior editor at IBTimes, her work has appeared in Forbes, Rolling Stone, Maxim, NYMag, Indiewire, and more. She co-produced the HBO documentary "Youth Knows No Pain" and appeared in a documentary series that aired alongside the Lifetime movie "Manson's Lost Girls."