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Aaron Hernandez

Aaron Hernandez was high on synthetic pot just before suicide behind bars? How did he get it?

‘John 3:16’ was found scrawled on the ex-NFL player’s forehead

Former NFL football star Aaron Hernandez reportedly smoked synthetic marijuana and wrote “John 3:16” on his forehead prior to hanging himself in his prison cell on late Tuesday night, at the Souza Baranowski Correctional Center in Boston.

CBS Boston reports that Hernandez, who hung himself with a bed sheet he attached to his prison cell window, was found early Wednesday morning while guards were doing a routine check. He apparently scrawled the phrase “John 3:16” on his forehead, a popular Bible verse that reads,

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

Authorities are investigating Hernandez’s alleged use of K2 shortly before his death, a synthetic version of marijuana. Investigators were tipped off by inmates that Hernandez was smoking “Spice,” another name for K2. It’s the same drug he was reportedly using on the night he killed Odin Lloyd in 2013. Side effects of K2, which is considered much more dangerous than real marijuana, include increased anxiety, agitation, psychotic episodes, and lack of emotional attachment.

Hernandez’s suicide happened less than a week after he was acquitted of the 2012 murders of Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado, and on the same day his former teammates on NFL team, New England Patriots, were honored at the White House.

Detectives are still investigating the motive behind the suicide. They’re currently questioning a 22-year-old inmate believed to be the last person to see Hernandez alive. The inmate is currently on suicide watch. Authorities haven’t indicated any reason to suspect foul play was involved.

Meanwhile, the New York Post reports that former teammates, Tom Brady and Tim Tebow, were worried about Hernandez long before his murder conviction. They apparently felt the need to “watch over” Hernandez, likely because of his violent tendencies. In 2007, he was arrested for punching a bouncer in Florida, and later, he was among several Florida Gators football players who opened fire into a vehicle, wounding two passengers.

[Feature Photo: AP/Nancy Lane/Pool]