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Jailhouse Justice? Mexican cartel leader who dismembered 6-year-old girl now in US prison

A Mexican drug cartel leader who brutally tortured and murdered a six-year-old girl in front of her parents is heading to prison for life, several times over.

According to San Antonio Express News, Marciano “Chano” Millan Vasquez was given seven consecutive life sentences for his direct involvement in 29 murders and for participating in the slaughter of 300 people in a rival drug cartel.

Among Millan Vasquez’s heinous crimes was the monstrous butchering of a six-year-old girl. A witness at his trial reportedly testified that Millan Vasquez held a family captive on their porch where a burning barrel stood nearby. The witness said that “Chano” took an axe to the little girl while she was still alive, cutting off her arm and her knee.

The little girl’s parents reportedly watched in horror, as Chano laughed, telling the father, “So you’ll remember me.”

Chano reportedly tossed the dismembered girl into the fire, and ordered her parents and a dozen more people to be killed in the same fashion.

The drug lord is also connected to the brutal March 2011 slaughter of more than 300 people in and around Piedras Negras as retaliation for a cartel member becoming an informant for U.S. law enforcement. Many of those killed had no connection to this person or the drug trade, including children.

According to the San Antonio Express News, the killers dissolved the victims’ bodies in acid or burned them in barrels.

“The level of violence … is something that is rarely seen in the courtroom and … rarely seen even in fiction,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Russ Leachman reportedly told the judge at the sentencing.

San Antonio Express News notes that Chano was permitted to be tried and sentenced in the United States for crimes committed in Mexico because the murders were part of a drug trafficking operation with connections to the U.S.

Chano was arrested in 2015 in San Antonio, Texas, where he was living under an alias with relatives.

 

Feature photo: Associated Press