Miranda Hopkins mugshot

‘Mom’ who killed baby and blamed it on her autistic sons found guilty of manslaughter

A Maine woman was convicted of manslaughter on Tuesday for the death of her 7-week-old baby. She originally pinned the infant’s death on her two autistic sons, claiming that they were likely responsible.

Associated Press reports that 32-year-old Miranda Hopkins testified in a Belfast courtroom that she had been taking shots of liquor and smoking marijuana when her baby, Jaxson, passed away in her Troy home in January. She claimed she had no idea how the baby died. She said she woke up and her baby was ““beat to hell” and lifeless.

During her 911 call, after she discovered her son dead, a sobbing Hopkins cried and screamed that her son was cold to the touch. She then claimed that her “profoundly autistic and nonverbal” sons, ages 6 and 8 at the time, must have done something to the infant after she blacked out. However, there was no evidence that either boy hurt their little brother.

According to the autopsy report, Jaxson died from blunt force trauma. The report indicated that the baby had a skull fracture, additional fractures in his right arm, and 15 rib fractures, according to Bangor Daily News.

“Significant force was exerted to cause those injuries, the type of force you’d see in an automobile crash,” Assistant Attorney General Leane Zainea said in October.

Zainea also said that it appeared that Jaxson’s injuries came about after he was violently shaken and “hit off a hard surface,” according to CM.

The jury took several hours to reach a guilty verdict. Some of Hopkins’ family members sat in the courtroom crying after the verdict was read. Hopkins was found guilty of felony manslaughter. She’s scheduled for sentencing on Dec. 13, and although Zainea asked that Hopkins remain in jail without bail until sentencing, Judge Robert Murray set her bail at $50,000.

A conviction of manslaughter in Maine carries of maximum sentence of 30 years behind bars. Check back with CrimeOnline as additional details become available.

[Feature Photo: Waldo County Jail]