Lily Mae Sharp

Teen girl pretends to hang herself in prank inspired by ’13 Reasons Why’ a day before actually committing suicide: Report

A 13-year-old British girl appeared in a grim video with school friends related to a controversial teen angst TV show prior to taking her own life. 

According to The Daily Mail, an inquest into the May 18, 2017 death of Lily Mae Sharp recently revealed that the teen had discussed the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” with friends the day before hanging herself at home in Bradwell, Cheshire, about 20 miles south of Manchester. 

On May 17, Sharp made a prank video with friends in the bathroom at Sandbach High School for Girls—apparently inspired by the show—where she was chosen by other students to don a toilet paper noose.

In a hearing Wednesday at Crewe Coroner’s Court, Sharp’s mother Victoria Noblet said said she “wondered about the video.”

“She was watching a Netflix series, ’13 Reasons Why,’ where I think that does bear some similarities.”

On the night of her daughter’s death, Noblet left Lily at home in charge of her younger sister. Noblet called Lily’s cell phone 26 times to no response, and returned at midnight to find her elder child deceased.

Noblet revealed that her daughter was having a difficult time accepting the end of her own marriage to Lily’s stepfather. Lily’s biological father David Pearson sent her to counseling after she admitted feeling worried and scared about the future.

Officials noted that Lily had some trouble at school. Other girls may have bullied her, and friends informed a teacher that she was “expressing dark thoughts.” Lily met with a school counselor six days before her death but denied that anything was wrong.

Cheshire coroner Alan Moore ruled the death a suicide, stating, “There was no obvious pattern of troubling behavior, no red flags appear, to alert family, friends, school to issues.”

As CrimeOnline previously reported, “13 Reasons Why” is a controversial drama about an American teenager who kills herself. The program has been accused of idealizing suicide and inspiring a rash of copycats.

[Feature Photo: Lily Mae Sharp/JustGiving]