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August Ames, porn star who committed suicide after online bullying, was sexually abused as a child and suffered from depression: Report

The popular porn star who committed suicide earlier this month after she was accused of making homophobic comments reportedly had history of sexual abuse and drug addiction.

As CrimeOnline previously reported, August Ames, 23, hanged herself on December 5, just days after she spoke out on social media against doing scenes with male performers who also work in gay porn.

After backlash from within her large social media following — a million Instagram followers and half a million on Twitter — Ames defended herself, insisting that her remarks should not be interpreted as homophobic.

Just two days later, the Canadian native was found dead by hanging in Ventura County, California. The medical examiner ruled her death a suicide.

Friends of Ames reportedly told The Blast that she had struggled with depression, and blamed the alleged online bullying for contributing to her suicide.

RadarOnline reports that earlier this year, Ames went on a podcast, Holly Randall Unfiltered, and revealed that she had been sexually abused as a child. And to make the situation worse, when she finally confided in her father, who she indicated knew her abuser, he did not support her.

“I have an awful relationship with my dad,” Ames reportedly said on the podcast.

“I tried to forget about it and talk to him about how I was feeling about my childhood and everything, because there was a lot of sexual molestation — not from my father but from his [redacted] — so I had to suffer from being molested by my [redacted]. When I finally told my dad, he didn’t believe me.”

The 23-year-old admitted that was given cocaine at the age of 15 from the father of a child she babysat for, and said she used alcohol and marijuana later in life.

Ames also said on the podcast that she had trouble finding a supportive therapist, because when she reached out for help, her choice of profession was blamed for her mental health struggles.

“I would get in contact with some people and then I would feel badly because they’d be like ‘What’s your profession and I’d be like ‘Oh, I’m in the adult industry’ and then I’d feel like they’re like ‘Oh, that’s the whole reason that you are the way you are’ and then I’d get turned off.”

Anyone who is struggling with suicidal thoughts is urged to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Feature image: Instagram/August Ames