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Teen boy kills himself after reported sexual assault, now Mom is fighting after accused rapist may get charges dropped [EXCLUSIVE]

An Ohio woman is pushing for justice after her son committed suicide in June, following a traumatic alleged sexual assault that left the boy devastated and broken.

Garon Hall, 18, took his own life a few months after he was reportedly kidnapped and raped by Dwight Lamar Orr, Jr., 44, a convicted felon with a lengthy criminal history, including involuntary manslaughter and a drug possession conviction. Orr is currently facing charges connected to the alleged sexual assault incident, but Garon’s mother, Terri Olmedo, fears that now that her son doesn’t have a voice and can’t testify, Orr could walk free.

Olmedo told CrimeOnline that the incident occurred at Orr’s house in Reynoldsburg, although it remains unclear how Garon ended up at the residence. Garon may have initially met Orr while they both worked at United Dairy Farmers off of Tussing Road in Reynoldsburg, but Olmedo isn’t certain of the exact time and place the two met.

“On April 22 I received a call from Garon, telling me he had been raped [and] he was at the United Dairy Farmers on Tussing Road where he worked. Me and my husband immediately went to UDF, picked Garon up, [and] he was scared, he was shaking, he was half dressed and he was in tears. We then spoke with some cops who escorted us to the hospital for a rape kit. The detectives came and spoke with him later. They came back with a lineup of pictures. Garon was able to pick Dwight Orr out of the line up. Hours later the SWAT team arrested Dwight.”

Dwight Lamar Orr, Jr. [Police Handout]
Orr is accused of pointing a gun to the teen’s head, then forcing himself on him while threatening to kill him. Court records indicate Orr has been charged with one count of kidnapping, one count of “having weapons while under disability,” and two counts of rape.

Shortly after the alleged incident, Olmedo said Garon escaped Orr’s home when another person showed up at the residence. Garon quickly ran to his place of employment and called for help.

Fast forward to June 29, Garon, left scarred from the incident, hanged himself. Olemdo’s brother found him, as Garon had moved to West Virginia to stay with his uncle for fear of his safety.

Garon was airlifted and taken to a Charleston hospital with “little to no brain activity.” He passed away on July 3.

Ormedo said Garon left behind note for his family, explaining that he loved his family but didn’t know to live with the pain.

“I love all of you with all my heart. I’m sorry I was not strong enough for this world. It’s all just too much for me to handle. I don’t want to go, but my head is destroying me and these thoughts are too much for me to handle. I just want them to stop. I feel like this is my only option.”

Garon as a young child [Photo via Terri Olmedo]
Shortly after his death, according to Olmedo, authorities informed her that with Garon deceased, there’s a chance charges against Orr would be dropped. On July 19, authorities released Orr from jail on his own recognizance.

Orr’s next hearing is August 9 and Olmedo is desperately fighting to ensure the charges against him stick. According to the Franklin County Prosecutor’s Office, the hearing will determine whether the charges will be dropped or if the case will move forward.

“Garon left a note saying he didn’t want to go but the thoughts of what happened were to much and he couldn’t handle them, and he didn’t know any other way to make them stop! Now my son is dead and this monster may walk free!” Olmedo told CrimeOnline.

Meanwhile, a family member set up a GoFundMe fundraiser, hoping to help recoup unexpected funeral and burial expenses, as well as get the attention of an attorney who could possibly help the family seek justice for Garon.

Garon was an avid rollerblader who loved being around his friends and making people smile, according to Olmedo. His organs were donated to six people after he passed away. Olmedo said her son’s heart “is now beating in a stranger,” someone she hopes to one day meet.

Garon is survived by his mother, Olmedo; his father, Jon McGowan; his brother, Chris; sister, Brianica; and step-sister, Skyla. Garon was Olmedo’s youngest child.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicidal thoughts, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255. The line is open 24-hours a day.

The story continues to develop. Check back with CrimeOnline as additional details become available.

[Feature Photo: Garon Hall/Family Handout]