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Celebrity sex cult doctor forced participants to watch horror videos of murder, rape, dismemberment and a man eating his own brain: Report

A doctor reportedly tied to the sex cult NXIVM has been accused of performing illegal and perverse experiments on humans, the New York Post reports.

The New York State Office of Professional Medical Conduct alleges that Dr. Brandon Porter showed “human subjects an actual video of the horrific and brutal murders and dismemberment of four women by machetes.”

Porter also allegedly showed subjects other violent recordings, including “a male African American being viciously stomped by a Nazi; a conscious male being forced to eat a portion of his own brain matter; and a graphic gang rape.”

Officials have further accused him of improper research, which included studies about Tourette’s syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder and an effort to monitor brain waves of NXIVM participants.

The state also asserts that Porter, 44, failed to notify public health agencies that some participants, including children, got sick with some sort of infectious illness at a 2016 event.

Regulators have charged him with gross negligence, gross incompetence and moral unfitness. As CrimeOnline previously reported, Smallville actress Allison Mack is also facing charges in connection to her alleged role in the cult. She is accused of recruiting women and coercing them into performing sex acts with cult leader Keith Raniere.

The Office of Professional Medical Conduct initially declined to take action against Porter after the agency received a complaint from Jennifer Kobelt, an ex-cult member, who alleged she was required to view videos showing mutilation and rape for a so-called “fright study.” He showed the revolting videos without warning, she said.

Kobelt said Porter may have conducted this research on as many as 100 people.

“He continued to film my reaction for at least 10 minutes as I just sat there, dry heaving like I was going to puke and crying very hard,” Kobelt wrote in her complaint.

“He failed me, not only as a friend but as the medical practitioner I had trusted on numerous occasions with my health while I was in New York.”

The oversight board had responded in a Sept. 6, 2017, letter notifying Kobelt that it would not launch an investigation because her allegations “are not medical misconduct.”

That was before the agency reversed itself and decided to take action against Porter.

Authorities plan to hold a hearing on June 27. Porter’s medical license could be suspended or revoked if the allegations are upheld.

Porter reportedly resigned from an Albany hospital this past fall and moved away from the area.

He graduated from the University of Iowa with a medical degree and obtained a New York medical license in 2009.

 

[Feature image: Alison Mack and legal team/Bebeto Matthews for Associated Press]